Home > Financial, Government and Politics > U.S. House Voted For Increase of More Tech Visas

U.S. House Voted For Increase of More Tech Visas

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With unemployment up 7.9 percent in November and 1.4 million  unfilled tech jobs  through 2018  the U.S. House of Representative voted 245 to 139 to increase the number of permanent – residence visas for those graduating from U.S. universities with doctoral or master’s degrees in science, technology, engineering and mathematics  (STEMS).

Backed by prominent technolgy firms such as Microsoft which had 6,000 job openings in September this year, the passing of the bill would keep the needed technology talent in the U.S.

“We are creating unfilled jobs,” said Microsoft chief counsel Brad Smith, speaking at a forum on immigration policy at the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C. in September “We have a shortage.”

“We can only gain by asking as many people who are smart and who create opportunities far beyond just their own to be part of our society,” said Representative Darrell Issa, a California Republican. “The benefit to our economy is undeniable.”

STEM jobs, including teaching positions, account for roughly 6 percent of the U.S. economy, according to Nicole Smith, a senior economist who studies the issue at the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce.

“We know some of the best schools in the world in those areas are found in the United States… This is a chance for them to cut out the red tape” and help graduates stay, she said.

“In a global economy, we cannot afford to educate these foreign graduates in the U.S. and then send them back home to work for our competitors,” said Texas Republican Representative Lamar Smith, chairman of the House Judiciary Committee who had introduced the “STEM Jobs Act,” and  supporter of this high tech visa program to help retain U.S. trained workers to boost innovation and job creation.

References.
Bloomberg.com
HuffingtonPost.com
Reuters.com
IDNews.com
USAToday.com
Informationweek.com

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